The Afterglow Vista

I listen to a number of podcasts frequently. It is something that I picked up while hiking the AT. All this free time, rather than listen to the same music over and over again, it’s nice to try and learn something.  One of the current podcasts I listen to is called “Lore”. It’s on ITunes, and Aaron Mahnke would be pretty happy that I’m publicizing his work. Lore is  “a bi-weekly podcast about the history behind scary stories”.  I don’t know if I was at the gym, or driving, but he had a very interesting podcast called “Dinner at the Afterglow”.  I quote from his podcast episode:

“Deep in the forest at the northern tip of a small island near Vancouver Island, there isa  stone monument standing amidst the trees.  How the structure came to be, and what i meant to those who built it, are both interesting stories.  But it’s the unofficial reports – the sightings and experiences of those who visit it – that truly deserve to be told”.

What? Is this a challenge Aaron? I mean, how many times are you literally an hour away from an eerie and cool place, which you pretty much have to visit? And i’m off.  Just incase you don’t know where the San Juan Island is, it’s northwest of Seattle.  I was living in Everett, and Vancouver was a nice 2 hour drive north. For a fee of 40 dollars, I was able to take my car on the 1.5 hour long ferry and cruise around the island.

Now, I’m not going to go through all the history exactly, But John S. Mcmillin was a business man who operated a large lime quarry and kiln operation in an area of the northwest tip of the San Juan Island between 1860 and 1910. This area was called “Roche Harbor”.  He established a hotel and chapel in this area, and finally, as his resting place, created this very impressive mausoleum.  He and his family members were cremated and placed in this mausoleum.  However, it’s no ordinary burial ground…He and his family members were actually placed inside chairs around a round table, surrounded by roman pillars.  A bronze dome was also in the works to be placed as a covering, however the family was unable to pay for the 30 thousand dollar piece.  There are many symbolic aspects to this monument, including an empty chair at the table.  Story goes, John’s son left the family in his mid twenties, and his father had never seen him again.  This missing chair was for his son that never returned to the family.  Below are a number of photos that I took from the visit, and on the links to the right, you may click on some further links to read up on some of the history.

 

Below are some more pictures of the Island. The first photo is a picture of my camera looking west, with the island of Victoria in the background, which is part of canada. I am only about 10 miles away from the boarder at this point. Also, check out the nesting Bald Eagle.